What do the Anomaly data types mean?

Created by John Rea, Modified on Mon, 29 Aug 2022 at 10:25 AM by John Rea

Scrutinize searches for dozens of different patterns in your client's books. Here is a list of the patterns we identify and information on why those might be important to flag.


Accounts Receivable Credits

Credit memos or journal entries taken against accounts receivable. Excessive entries against accounts receivable that are not related to receipt of payment can be a sign of various fraudulent schemes or improper accounting procedures.


Checks to Cash or No Payee

Checks made out to "Cash" or with no payee. All transactions should have a proper name associated with them. Transactions without proper names are usually a clerical error, but can be used to cover up fraud.


Checks to Vendors with Bills

Checks written against expense accounts for vendors with amounts in Accounts Payable. Vendor payments should be applied directly to their bills instead of written directly against an expense account. This can signal incorrectly applied vendor payments or potentially fraudulent activity.


Credits to Expense

Credits taken against expense account types. A large volume of credits taken against expense accounts can signal lots of refund activity, which could be linked to fraudulent purchasing schemes or control breakdowns.


Customer Names in Expenses

Transactions coded to an expense account and tagged with customer name. There is usually very little overlap between vendor and customer names. Often this signals that a deposit or return was incorrectly recorded.


Debits to Income

Debits taken against income account types. A large volume of debits taken against income accounts can signal lots of return activity, which could be linked to fraudulent customer schemes or control breakdowns.


Deposits from Customers with Invoice

Deposits straight to income accounts for customers with amounts in Accounts Receivable. Customers that have invoices should have their payments applied directly to those invoices and not deposited directly into an income account. This can signal incorrectly applied customer receipts or potentially fraudulent activity.


Duplicate Bills

Duplicate bills for the same vendor. All transactions should have unique identifiers. Duplication is often a clerical error, but can signal more serious issues.


Duplicate Checks

Duplicates in the checks register. All transactions should have unique identifiers. Duplication is often a clerical error, but can signal more serious issues.


Duplicate Invoices

Duplicates in the invoice register. All transactions should have unique identifiers. Duplication is often a clerical error, but can signal more serious issues.


Duplicate Expenses

Duplicate expense transactions. All transactions should have unique identifiers. Duplication is often a clerical error, but can signal more serious issues.


Expenses to Vendors with Bills

Expense transaction types associated with vendors with amounts in Accounts Payable. All vendors with open bills should have amounts paid to them recorded as bill payments. Transactions coded directly to expense accounts are often clerical errors, and can lead to incorrect Accounts Payable and expense account balances.


Expenses with No Payee

Expenses with no payee. All transactions should have a proper name associated with them. Transactions without proper names are usually a clerical error, but can be used to cover up fraud.


Inconsistent Customer Coding

Transactions for Customers where the account selected for the transaction is inconsistent inside the report period. For some vendors, this is normal, but it can also be a sign of a clerical error. 


Inconsistent Vendor Coding

Transactions for Vendors where the account selected for the transaction is inconsistent inside the report period. For some vendors, this is normal, but it can also be a sign of a clerical error.


Missing Checks

Gaps in the check register. This happens most often when someone deletes something that should have been voided. In more serious cases, it can be used to cover up internal fraud. There should be no gaps in your registers.


Missing Invoices

Gaps in the invoice register. This happens most often when someone deletes something that should have been voided. In more serious cases, it can be used to cover up internal fraud. There should be no gaps in your registers.


Non-numeric Checks

Checks with alphabetical or special characters in the number. Checks should only ever have numerical transaction identifiers. This can signal the transaction was entered incorrectly.


Round Dollar Payments

Payments for round dollar amounts. Excessive amounts of round dollar payments can signal theft or fraud. Review these transactions and look for suspicious recurring transactions.


Uncategorized Assets

Transactions coded to "Uncategorized Assets" account. Transactions should be coded to descriptively named accounts. Amounts left for long periods in this account can signal poor internal communication and lack of attention to detail.


Uncategorized Expenses

Transactions coded to "Uncategorized Expense", "Ask My Accountant", "Not Specified", or "Reconciliation Discrepancies". Transactions should be coded to descriptively named accounts. Amounts left for long periods in these accounts can signal poor internal communication and lack of attention to detail.


Uncategorized Income

Transactions coded to "Uncategorized Income" account. Transactions should be coded to descriptively named accounts. Amounts left for long periods in this account can signal poor internal communication and lack of attention to detail.


Unreconciled Bank Transactions

All unreconciled bank transactions. These transactions should be inspected to identify whether they were incorrectly added to the bank account or if the account needs to be reconciled more frequently.


Unreconciled Credit Card (CC) Transactions

All unreconciled credit card transactions. These transactions should be inspected to identify whether they were incorrectly added to the bank account or if the account needs to be reconciled more frequently.


Updated System Admin Transactions

Manually updated transactions originally created by "System Administration" and "Online Banking Administration". Users should generally not have to update transactions created by administrator account types. Inspect these transactions for any suspicious signs.


Vendor Names in Income

Transactions coded to an income account and tagged with vendor name. There is usually very little overlap between vendor and customer names. Often this signals that a deposit or return was incorrectly recorded.

Was this article helpful?

That’s Great!

Thank you for your feedback

Sorry! We couldn't be helpful

Thank you for your feedback

Let us know how can we improve this article!

Select atleast one of the reasons

Feedback sent

We appreciate your effort and will try to fix the article